Pride London: some photos

21 July 2010

Pride London, Saturday 3rd July 2010.

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A couple of weeks ago was London Pride. Despite my reservations about some elements I really do enjoy Pride. I’ve uploaded a slideshow and gallery of some of my photos.

There are more Pride photos on Pride’s flickr and iamsoho (1) and (2).


seeking inspiration and parties

9 August 2008

It’s odd… since my return from holiday I have been less inspired to blog – not because i can’t be bothered, not even because I don’t have time, but mainly because there’s not a lot interesting going on that’s made me want to write. There’s plenty I see which has irritated me – plenty of long rants I could post about… but nothing’s made me really itchy, irritable and immediately wanting to write. My brain is full of little things, not big things…

Last weekend we went to Brighton Pride. Brighton’s always the funnest of the Prides I attend – with a fun parade (even though it starts early in the morning) and lots of entertainment in Preston Park after that. Pride London’s bigger and – although fun – doesn’t have quite the same feel. Then again Brighton turns into London-on-Sea for Pride which, for me, is not a bad thing!

However, in going, I missed this year’s Europride in Stockholm. Stockholm and Brighton Prides are very similar in lots of ways (although less dancing in Stockholm and more stage acts). They’re both quite community driven, there’ a lot of visitors from outside the city, and there’s a lot going on – in Stockholm a whole week of seminars, parties and other events – oh and Stockholm Pride is massive!

After a busy week this week I’m off to a party tonight and Gutterslut after that! I’ve also realised my next few weekends are almost totally full with plans! Surely I must have more blogspiration (errr, did that work? it was meant to merge blog and inspiration, not blog and perspiration) soon!


Returning

27 July 2008

I’ve unashamedly been keeping my distance from the news recently – holidays are great for that… and had no real desire to get back into it too much since my return. More dismay for the labour party isn’t something I want to engage in too much, but I appear, unfortunately to have missed some interesting thing I would normally have been blogging on.

Despite the exuberant gayness of the weeks I’ve missed I haven’t heard any more from Heinz, despite the fact the Advertising Standards Authority won’t be investigating. Yesterday I bought Sainsbury’s organic baked beans… I also missed out on the fun of Iris Robinson’s descent into madness and it’s implications for the Tory and DUP partnership. Lighter news I missed may have been a second resignation in two months for Boris Johnson, and another appointment. I’ve even not commented on the Evening Standard’s assertion that there are more gays in the London tory party than on Old Compton Street (they’re trying to fight political correctness don’t you know)…

And sadly I was somewhere travelling through the Alps while the Pride parade, attended by 825,000 people (!), and Boris’s pink stetson, were winding their way through London’s streets. I’m also missing this year’s Europride in Stockholm after the holiday took all my money and time over the last few weeks. And the need for a night in led to me missing a plethora of acts on the final night of G-A-Y at the Astoria (although it appears Kylie didn’t show up)… I’ll be sad to see it go…

Anyway, to make up for this I’ll take some time today so ignore the politics and write an entry on another favourite topic of food – what else could I write about after a holiday in Italy???!!!


Boris’s Pride outfit and the political precipice

30 June 2008

So so sad I cannot be there… wouldn’t this be amazing! Thanks Dave! I still think he’d do worse than follow Dr David Bull’s outfit.

In more exciting news perhaps the country’s wonky shopping trolley wheel is unashamedly steering us towards that rather worrying looking precipice on the right.

But how far? I hope the New Statesman doesn’t have the answer:

An increasing number of traditional Labour voters believe that the party no longer reflects their interests. This is in no small measure a result of new Labour’s triangulation tactic – a deliberate shift to what the political class thinks is the “centre ground”. It is also a symptom of a failure to prioritise grass-roots activism at the local level, instead flirting with the “virtual party” and delivering messages through centralised marketing. The danger is not only that we ignore the reasons for the strength of the BNP, but that in so doing we reinforce the very conditions that have created it.


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