Germany’s out

13 July 2010

So the German football team is a “bunch of gays”. Although I’m not sure who the “experts” that “estimate that around 10 per cent of all Bundesliga professionals are gay” are (experts in gayness? football? gay football?) it would not be surprising if the team which as been “celebrated for being the youngest in 76 years and more ethnically diverse than any team in Germany football history” had a few gays in there too.

Football – perhaps sport in general – is an area where being gay is still a tabboo. Just look at how few gay athletes were at the Beijing Olympics. It’s one of the reasons the Gay Games still exists – that and a lot of the gay teams that enter are perhaps not up to the caliber of more professional teams – this year, ironically in Cologne, Germany. I wonder if any of the German football team will turn up? I also wonder if Britain can do any better at making London 2012 athletes feel comfortable coming out? Wouldn’t that be a wonderful legacy to leave sport?


Recovering Doric

19 May 2009

Living fairly close to Euston station, and having known it for the last few decades as my gateway to London from my home in the midlands, it’s history fascinates me. The unlovely functionalist 1960s station is practical and large, it serves its function well, but it’s not got the romance, history or stories of other London stations. The Times art columnist said

“It gives the impression of having been scribbled on the back of a soiled paper bag by a thuggish android with a grudge against humanity and a vampiric loathing of sunlight. And the fact that it replaced a much-loved old station, wiping out the Classical portico of the Euston Arch, only compounds its offensiveness.”

Which is why I was fascinated to read that the Doric arch, or what remains of it (or most of it that didn’t end up forming a rockery in the back garden of the guy that demolished it), is being recovered from it’s subsequent resting place, thanks to the London Olympics.

Developing Prescott Lock to enable construction materials to be transported to and from the Olympic site in a more sustainable way than dirty road lorries has meant that the remains of the arch, which since 1962 have been basically blocking a hole in the tidal riverbed, are finally being recovered. More on the story here, here and here.

Although I am a town planner, I don’t have a strong conservationist streak. But the story of Euston, and the threatened near-by St Pancras, make you realise what a sense of pride and sense of place architectural history can give you. After one of the most shocking pieces of architectural vandalism it’s now hoped that the arch can be reconstructed, not in it’s original place (somewhere near Platform 8, apparently) but perhaps in the redevelopment of Euston station (possibly looking like the image below), or elsewhere. Even if you cannot stop progress, meeting the needs of future generations, and the ability to integrate architectural history into developing places, is an important challenge we need to grasp.


Matthew Mitcham and Out Sports

27 August 2008

Following my earlier post about Matthew Mitcham, the only openly gay male in the Beijing Olympics, he won, much to my delight, Gold in a suitably impressive way. I knew little about diving until two weeks ago when the media-overhyped and pressurised British 14 year old was diving. But as time went on my interest grew, for obvious reasons, and because I realised what a technical and impressive sport it is. Matthew Mitcham’s incredible last dive was unprecedentedly impressive, according the the BBC commentary (although their follow-up news articles focused much more on the Tom Daley’s seventh position) – not bad to be seventh in the world though eh?)

In my mind, and responding to some of the comments on my last post, Matthew Mitcham’s sexuality shouldn’t matter in his sport (unlike sexuality in diving did ten years ago). But what having an out gay man at the Olympics does – especially one that wins gold – is it empowers others. It’s not just high profile life which benefits from such openness. It gives hope to the other gay boys at school, for example, who feel like their sexuality’s a barrier to them playing sport.

Only ten of this years Olympians were openly gay, yet it’s likely many more were open about their sexuality to other athletes. Wouldn’t it be a wonderful thing if other gay athletes from countries where opinions on sexuality are more liberated could come out and inspire those who may not feel able to do so. What better means than through an international event where performance matters more than who you’re attracted to?

Matthew Mitcham shouldn’t be known as ‘that gay diver’. He says…

“I just want to be known as the Australian diver who did really well at the Olympics… It’s everyone else who thinks it’s special when homosexuality and elite sport go together”.

…but he should be known as an incredible diver, and someone whose bravery and athletic performance inspire others – regardless of sexuality.

Interestingly, this comes at a time when the International Gay and Lesbian Football Association World Cup is on in London. Although this is unlikely to be seen as ‘elite sport’, the tournament has great aims behind it:

We are dedicated to providing a world class event which will show that London can provide a safe and welcoming environment, which pushes the boundaries of tolerance and acceptance and which encourages gay men and women to promote themselves in a positive and healthy manner.

We firmly believe that football should be enjoyable for all, free from discrimination on the grounds of sexuality and accessible to people of all backgrounds and all sporting abilities.

So congratulations to Matthew Mitcham, and the IGLFA, for helping to remind us that whatever our sexual preferences we can play sport. It’s an inspiration to me that sport – something which, for many, is a euphemism for the closet can be inclusive. In a world where homophobia’s not dead and buried, where, in the papers today, prospective City employees, for example, feel unable to their sexuality, it’s good to know there are role models and people to look up to even whether or not sport’s your game…

…which reminds me, I should really go to the gym…


Olympians Out in China

14 August 2008

It was with interest, and by accident, this morning I stumbled upon Matthew Mitcham. Not literally, but by noticing a number of facebook friends had become ‘fans’ of his. It wasn’t until I started looking into it I realised that it’s not just because he’s a good looking diver, like the others I’ve mentioned. He’s also gay and came out publicly in Australia this year.

Interesting reading how struggling with issues in his life has made him stronger. The Sydney Morning Herald said:

Mitcham thinks he would not be going to the Olympics if not for the hardship he endured.

He said: “I probably wouldn’t have as much of a fighting spirit. The more you have experienced, the more you have to draw off. I look at the last 20 years as a long, winding path of lessons and some hardship. I hope the rest of my life isn’t straight because that could be boring. I hope it continues to wind, but maybe not so tumultuous. I hope I do have a long and winding path and more lessons to learn. I look forward to that.”

He’s not the only gay olympian this year. It’s good to see out athletes who can compete alongside other athletes at the games. It’s great for sport, and it’s great for gay people growing up who may feel alienated, as I did, from sport.

And surely, it can’t be a bad thing for China where gay people in some ways feel the same in society as gay people around the world in sport can: that you have to hide who you are.

One of China’s gay campaigners says: “Many Chinese gays – burdened with ignorance, discrimination and fear – are unable to comprehend their homosexual yearnings and close themselves off from society, tormented by self-hate. After the age of 30, more than 90 percent of gays get married – because social pressure makes them believe they have no choice”. Intimidated by society and the police gay people in china tend to live secret lives. (more)

How great it is for gay olympians to be competing in China. It’s a wonderful way to show China and the world that gay people can be part of a diverse group of people. I wish them good luck and hope that young gay people all around the world realise that they can achieve what they want to and that sexuality should not be a barrier.


meow! (splash) (II)

12 August 2008

Good advice from a Guardian Comment is Free blogger* for Tom Daley and Blake Aldridge following their little spat yesterday:

…hang on a minute. You’re eighth in the world at a sport! Admittedly, a slightly weird sport, but eighth! That’s brilliant! I’m not eighth in the world at anything. I’m probably not even the eighth best Carrie Quinlan in the world, because I know for a fact there’s one who’s a star on the University of Buffalo swim team. Eighth in the world, dude! Do you know how many people there are in the world? Loads, probably. Definintely more than nine. Well done, the pair of you.

She has a very good point. and made me thoroughly depressed… it could of course be worse, while googling my own post from yesterday i came across a similarly titled one about Kevin’s boring life and his night of being kept awake by amorous cats… it’s amazing what you can find online!
_____

( * = despite the Guardian sending me hunting the wrong tinyurl … what on earth is Gaia online?) PS – this is update on the pair I posted reference to yesterday as well…


where on earth?

11 August 2008

Thanks to Ade for pointing out Recess Monkey’s posting on Sky News’s journalistic qualities and not actually knowing which Georgia they’re on about… It’s probably a good thing Bush doesn’t rely on Sky for his breaking news alerts otherwise he’d already be lighting the blue touchpaper and aiming his nukes at Moscow if he thought the Russians had invaded *that* Georgia… We can add this to the same list as the ‘Tiananmen Square Massacre Remembered’ by Yahoo… No wonder I hold the media in disdain


meow! (splash)

11 August 2008

I rather enjoyed this morning’s synchronised diving – it even made me late for work… and the news that the British pair came last was quite a disappointment – more so for the two divers – the older of the two ‘blamed’ his partner:

It’s a synchro team, there’s two of us, and that’s the hard thing about it,” Aldridge said. “Both of you have to be on your game at the same time and that just didn’t happen today. Thomas is 14 years old. He’s done phenomenally and for me to be a part of a partnership with him is a great thing. I knew, going into this Olympic Games, that we were capable of a medal, but I also knew that it depended on how Tom performed. I wasn’t on the top of my game, but I out-dived Thomas today and that’s not something that normally happens. That to me is because he had a lot more pressure on him than I did.

…of course blame is a rather strong choice of word for a rather eloquent explanation of how things turned out…

I feel sorry for Blake Aldridge – and it looks to me as though he wasn’t so much blaming his partner as the hype mounded on him by an over-expectant media. My disdain for the media and it’s way of ‘reporting’ things is one thing that really irritates me – though perhaps more understandable when you’re talking about the Olympics! But – while he’s the youngest of the two – it’s quite unfair that reporting – and therefore pressure – has focused so much on him, not the partnership.

Anyway, aside from the two of them I also realised that it’s a fun sport to watch, not just for the dives, but the divers too 😉
(more details on those two here and here)


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